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Anyone remember Paul K. Guillows models?

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Here is a link to Guillows Models. He was a Naval Aviator in WWI! :o

http://homenewshere.com/middlesex_east/article_9ae393d6-7d8a-11e5-8665-37f441876f78.html

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I didn't know that Guillows took over North Pacific. At one time, the early 70s, I used to modify the North Pacific Sleek Steak with slightly extended wings, polyhedral, and a lengthened fuselage. The lengthened fuselage allowed for a longer rubber motor to pack in more winds. Those were the only rubber powered airplanes that ever provided me with true fly away losses.

I built a bunch of Guillows stick and tissue models, some of which did not fly very well, particularly the biplanes. The last was a Neuport 27. So hard trim that it met its demise before I ever figured it out. Of course I lived in Hanksville then and the proverbial long grass was nowhere to be found.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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Good to hear some replies! I've had numerous chuck gliders, the biplanes, pretending to dogfight. The other kits, I've built, were the free flight ones, the Cherokee 140, the Super cub, the lancer and the arrow, the Fairchild 24, they were all great flying airplanes! The Cessna 150 didn't fly very well. I never tried the bigger ones.

Randy

Last edit: by Pilatuspc12


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I think they had some control line models , as well.

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Some of my first model planes were Quillows rubber powered models.  If I remember right, the kit cost 10 cents and a tube of glue cost 5 cents. I had no idea what I was doing but I managed to get one to taxi a few feet, and even got one to take off and fly for about a foot or so.  At the time I felt that to be a succsess.  Then due to the war they could not get balsa wood so they started useing cardboard for the formers. I built one of those with about a 6 inch wingspan. I think that kit cost 5 cents. The prop blades were made of cardstock glued into a short cardboard tube.
I think that at that time I had only seen 2 or 3 completed model airplanes, and only seen 1 fly and that quite a distance away. The good old days?
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That's neat, Jim Z. and Jim F. I think this is definitely a lost art, where people actually build their airplanes and sometimes they fly and sometimes they don't!  :lol:

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Here's what started it all!

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