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Aviation History and Trivia

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Aviation triva

I am not for sure but I think it was the "G" model or maybe the "H". I used to follow the 51 pretty thoroughly. I do know that the turbo model was a little longer because of the engine.
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It was made by the Piper Aircraft Company. It was called the PA-48 Enforcer. It was was designed as a Counter-Insurgency, ground attack aircraft that could haul quite a bit of stores. One of the models had a Rolls-Royce Dart engine of about 2500 shp (shaft horse power) and the other model used an Avco-Lycoming T-56 helicopter engine. I think this engine was slightly less horsepower. Still, with more horse power than the piston powered version, it wasn't as fast as the original P-51 Mustang but could haul a much greater load of weapons. As far as I know, they only made two prototypes and never went into production.

Onward and Upward.
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I remember the name Enforcer, but had completely forgotten about it. A bit surprised it was slower.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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I was just looking at my 1943-44 issue of Jane's all the World's Aircraft, and it states that the first issue was published 33 years prior to 1944.  It's amazing that the world was so fascinated with aircraft that those books were first published that long ago. Just think of the changes in aviation from 1911 to 1944, and from 1944 until now. Such rapid advancement.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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Just looking at my last issue of Air and Space Smithsonian, and did you know that the Bell X-1 when it broke the sound barrier for the first time carried a load of fuel that weighed more than twice what the airplane itself did. The B-29 that carried it aloft was hefting about 15,000 pounds of rocket powered airplane up to over 30 thousand feet.  I can't imagine what a ride Chuck Yeager had in that thing with 4 rocket engines kicking him in the butt for the first time; not knowing for certain what was going to happen. Good grief that was the year before I was born, way back in neanderthal times.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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And what year was that neanderthal man?
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Let's see, they just celebrated the 70th anniversary of supersonic flight. So let's do the math……… :lol:

Onward and Upward.
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You would do the math. So it had to be 1947.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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Let's see, what year was the United States Air Force formed?

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Something tells me that it might have been the same year.  Could be huh.


Thermals---I need thermals!
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My turn. Since the Bell X-1 had no windshield deicing system, how did they keep it from icing up and blocking the pilot's view?

Thermals---I need thermals!
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Not a single guess? Aw c'mon guys. The crew chief rubbed a coating of Drene Shampoo on the inside of the windscreen and that did the trick.  Interestingly, I currently use a thin coating of baby shampoo on the inside of my swim goggles to keep them from fogging up, and it works. Low tech sometimes isn't so bad.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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At supersonic speeds, the air friction would keep it frost free. :P

Onward and Upward.
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The entire flight wasn't supersonic it did start at somewhere around 30k or so of I remember right. I'll check on that one. Based on the article in Air and Space icing was a concern.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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I understand. Oh, it would have frosted up on the climb up. It gets cold at 30,000 feet above sea level. Especially if it wasn't treated. I guess they had some sort of electrical heating in it as well.  We used to spit in our dive masks, when we had too but that is unsanitary. :lol:

Onward and Upward.
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