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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Yes, each main blade is 710mm. Also the rotor head is included in the total disk span.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Pilatuspc12, is it strange that blade tip to blade tip is the total disk area?
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

So today I made an esc stand off because the esc wouldn't fit between the main frames. I'm hoping to finish it this weekend and begin wiring. I haven't had a chance to get much done on the build with being so busy at work lately.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

AnthonyC440 said

 Pilatuspc12, is it strange that blade tip to blade tip is the total disk area?
Hi Anthony, yes, it is. It would appear that all of that disk area, is not lifting surface. Randy

Onward and Upward.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Pilatuspc12 said

 

AnthonyC440 said

 Pilatuspc12, is it strange that blade tip to blade tip is the total disk area?
Hi Anthony, yes, it is. It would appear that all of that disk area, is not lifting surface. Randy
I can understand where you would think that. A lot of the disk is actually not producing much lift though. The outer tip of the blades is where the lift really comes from since its traveling the fastest. As you move in the rotation is much slower, and not contributing much lift. Anthony [br]
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Ok, its been awhile since I've been able to work on the Diabolo. Work has been stacking up on me. Finally, I've got a day to concentrate on this project. I started earlier this week on a ESC stand which is kind of usual. I have an YGE 120a High Voltage controller that I ended up not using from another build, so I decided to use it. Its a tough German made controller that can handle the heat a little better than a Castle Creations. The problem that I've had with the esc is that its huge! I think any other ESC would fit between the main frames no poblems. I researched it and found that they make a special stand for the esc for the Diabolo. Problem is that I ordered it but they told me that they are out of stock due to changes from YGE's design. Either way, I'm S.O.L. I went to talk to Ultra Hobbies and bought up some possible materials that I could use to make a stand to make the esc fit. I ended up using some aluminum hollow tube, all thread, and some nylon nuts. Before I go further, Wayne went out of his way as I've seen him do the same for others. I ended going back to his shop after noticing I didn't have a piece of carbon fiber large enough to build this contraption. He went into his back room and pulled some of his own stock material and gave it to me to bring back what I didn't use. I have to say thank you and a I hope that I can return the favor! Ok, so I ended up building a base that will take place of the stock esc mounting plate so that I could build up some stand offs to raise the esc above the main frames. It ended up being very tedious but end up ok. As you can see in the picture in came out alright. I ended up with a few problems with it though. I counter sunk the screws that mount the base to the frame cross spacers. I did it by hand and ended up doing a little too much towards the nose causing the spacer to be off center a bit. I just had to leave it loose til I mounted it to the frame, and then tighten it down. Also the stand off ended up being quite high off the mounting plate, and was a little wobbly. I was pretty burnt out by now and probably could have done a few things to stiffen it up, but I think I'll probably still strap the ESC to frame to stablize it even more. I think it will work for this application. Last little issue I ran into was that the placement of the esc ran into where the frame cross spacers were. I moved it enough so that I could just use a dremel a little material away to make the stand off locations work. This step actually took several hours trying get everything to line up, and actually have it look decent. Also to see what would work. I ended up using servo rubbers as a damper to help protect the esc since its mounted by the PC board. Also cutting the aluminum tubing at a 15 degree angle top and bottom the esc so the bolt would go straight through was touch. I used a mitre saw, and was tough to get exact. All in all I think I came out ok.[br][br][br][br][br][br][br] [br]

Last edit: by Arbo

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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Its been a long busy day. It doesn't seem like it should be this hard, but when you want to make components work you have to do what you have to do. I felt good after the esc stand off so I went forward with some soldering of some electronics. I soldered on some 5mm bullets onto the motor to go to the ESC. It was actually kind of nice that they weren't 8/6 awg wire for once. Gosh, I hate soldering that big wire. Then I mentioned before that I'm going to run the electronics by a 2s 2250 mah lipo, so I soldered up a harness. I used #14 gauge from an ec-3 to two 18 awg servo end leads. I want to parallel feed the FBL controller, and the receiver to avoid any kind of failure/ over draw of the system. I probably should have made 3 or 4 parallel feeds as a redundancy, but I didn't think about it when I was doing it. I also like to use 14 awg wire to start the circuit because of 20-25 amp draws to the servos, but also due to fatigue. The #14awg won't break after twisting and movement so easily given its a good solder joint. Next to solder up is the Governor phase sensor harness. The YGE ESC is capable to send out a phase sensor signal to the FBL controller, but a harness is needed. I had to search out how the harness needed to be made from YGE from a servo extension. So off the YGE ESC it has two leads; one to the throttle lead to the FBL controller, and one to the FBL controller governor input. End result is the FBL has control of the throttle, and know exactly the RPM of the motor from the phase sensor. Next up was a prewire of the servos, and other misc electronics. This set is a pain in the ass, and here's why! Some electronics can move, and some can't. With the things that can move can be adjusted to get the "Center of Gravity" set. Everything has to be balanced with the Main rotor. The things that can move around is the placement to the flight packs, RX pack, (esc can't move now), (FBL can't move since it has a location allocated), and the Canopy for sure can't move but plays a big portion of it. So now that the lipo's are really the only variable I adjusted and tried many combo's to see what will work. It seems that the RX pack is the hardest to set with minimal spaces to move it. I opted to put the RX pack in the back somewhere by the boom, or under the packs. I'll figure that out as the wiring comes together after finding out that the helicopter is naturally nose heavy. CG is figured out best that I"ve found by turning the helicopter sideways and seeing if the nose or tail falls due to gravity. It must have the canopy on after adjusting the LIPO's forward/back and any other electronics that can move. As you can see in the pictures I have a fine mess going on with the wiring. After everything has been placed and finalize I can start securing all wires neatly. The important thing here is to keep any wires away from moving parts and especially from belts/gears! I'm finding this air frame is going to be a tough wiring job because of the bomb proof drive train. They've done a great job of making everything tough, but successively blocked all easy paths through the frame. I'm a little proud so I want to run all wires inside of the frame to keep a clean look, but its going to be hell. It'll be well worth it in the end. Anthony [br][br][br][br][br][br]
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Since I've touched a few times in the thread about a governor I thought I would elaborate a little on it. At first it seems a lot like black magic, and can give you a little hell getting it to work correctly. A few things to understand out of the gate about it; The throttle is not actually managed by your throttle stick on your tx. Depends on your FBL unit but you usually give a flat throttle curve signal to the FBL that will designate a preset RPM. Now the FBL controller knows already what inputs you give to the helicopter so it can predict a low or high demand to give a throttle input to maintain a constant head speed. Just a few hundred rpm's can have a drastic change on how the control feel in the air. Many maneuvers demand precise control, and consistency in rpm is crucial. There are two types of governors in the electric world. One is reactive. A reactive gov is found in the ESC programming. It works by watching the rpms of the motor and when it sees a droop in rpms it will raise the throttle to compensate. It will also do the same while under no load. End result is the RPM either over speeding , or rpm lag. This will give you a better consistency than a regular throttle curve. The next new generation of governors is Proactive. Now that the FBL takes your input to the helicopter and calculates it then sends commands to the helicopter things can get interesting. So the fbl unit will predict by inputs given by you. For instance you give pitch forward to speed up the FBL controller will up the throttle and wait for an input back from the helicopter. If the throttle response is needed it will wait for another input to respond again. If its not needed it will receive errors and re decide a response. These are the things to adjust in its P. I. , and D algorithms. Mechanical setups for a governor. The key to the whole thing is gearing to maintain a consistant head speed at the lowest voltage output of your lipo pack. This can be calculated by your KV rating of your motor used(volt to rpm output),and you also know the safe low voltage output of your lipo. Then your lowest rpm possible can be calc'd. Now with a charged lipo you can have a capability of a higher surge while keeping the lower rpm constant. If you keep the lower rpm constant then you have more throttle on reserve to give while under load. This is called headroom. The most importand thing about helicopter 3d flight is consistency in your controls, and a proactive governor is key. Not only does flight controls become predictable, but so does the tail. Under heavy loading the tail will kick out in either direction and if you have flown a helicopter this will take your confidence away from you very quickly. Not to mention consistency. The gov will help even out the tail giving you a rock solid tail that will not move unless commanded to. Hope this is enlightening to some Anthony
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Right, same as a propeller. 80 percent of the thrust comes from the outer 20 percent of the diameter.

Onward and Upward.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Pilatuspc12 said

 Right, same as a propeller. 80 percent of the thrust comes from the outer 20 percent of the diameter.
Although, another variable is thrown into the problem. Advancing, and retreating blade progression. In a plane all sides of the blade is pulling in the same amount of air. In a helicopter the blades are able to grab more air on advancing side than the retreating side in forward flight. This is what stumped the early helicopter pioneers. Blade Flapping was needed… maybe I'll talk about this later. Anthony
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Wow, Anthony, this information is enlightening and intimidating at the same time. This has obviously taken many years of experience to achieve your level of expertise. Randy

Onward and Upward.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Thank you Randy. I've definitely been intimidated by this hobby, but like anything else it has been baby steps. They're many things to learn, but around each corner is something new to learn that makes things interesting. Flight is something relatively new to me, and I want to learn more! I really want to learn more, and from you guys! Anthony
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Sorry about the delay on the Diabolo build since I've been really busy the last several weeks. I have the helicopter pretty much wired now. Like I said it is wired now, and I only have a few things that need to be done before programming can begin. I just need to make the tail rod, and re shim the head to get the proper head damping that I need for my flying style. I'm hoping to finish this tomorrow, and begin programming the Ikon Flybarless controller. I'm not really going to cover much of the last mechanical items, but will be concentrating on the programming portion, and head/tail setup of the model. Stay tuned, Anthony
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

Looking forward to seeing it fly.

Onward and Upward.
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Helicopter Build - Minicopter Diabolo 700

This is an education. I knew these things were complex, but I'm not sure I could cope with this. Mental overload complete with smoke would occur.

Thermals---I need thermals!
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